THE SHE SHED's Guide to Watering Your New Garden

 A watering can is great for a small job but a new collapsible watering hose is our go-to tool watering tool on job sites. Lightweight and space saving, they shrink up and fit into a medium sized mesh bag that we keep in our garden bag.   (Photo credit: Michael Coghlan) 

A watering can is great for a small job but a new collapsible watering hose is our go-to tool watering tool on job sites. Lightweight and space saving, they shrink up and fit into a medium sized mesh bag that we keep in our garden bag.   (Photo credit: Michael Coghlan) 

The mulch has been placed, shrubs pruned, perennials dead-headed and cut back, new plants carefully placed and designated established perennials divided and transplanted…the garden renovation is complete. And it worked; your garden is looking fabulous, just like it should.

Now it’s time to sit back, let the plants fill out and do nothing but relax until the next weeding… Almost.

A plant responds to relocation the same way a lot of us do: with stress! The best way to help mitigate the strain your new planting is experiencing is to ensure it is thoroughly hydrated. If you’ve opted for mulch, you’ve already given your plants the advantage of water retention, soil temperature moderation, reduced competition from weeds, and a nutrient boost, but they still require frequent watering.

If you want to keep your revitalized garden looking healthy and vibrant, you simply must water your plants.

Here is THE SHE SHED’s guide to caring for your newly renovated garden.

Trees and shrubs

Depending on the variety of shrub or tree, spring and fall are preferred for planting or transplanting. Sometimes, however, it is not practical to wait for these times and we use a number of tactics to mitigate plant stress.

If caring for a renovated garden during the summer months, it is especially important to pay attention to the following steps.

1.)    Planting. We hand pick nursery items for client gardens to ensure plant vitality and thoroughly water all plants about to be transplanted. Site preparation includes the right size hole which is filled to check for good drainage and moisten the surrounding soil to keep newly planted roots cool and hydrated. We use bone meal to help bolster overall health and plant…adding a final soak for good measure. But the process doesn’t end there.

2.)    Week number one. This first week after new plantings, water trees with a nice slow soak in the surrounding soil once a day. Either the cool of the morning or evening is best, being sure to avoid the firehose effect of blasting at its foliage and roots with an open hose. 

3.)    Week number two. Last week’s watering gave the shrub a chance to adjust to its new environment and it is a little stronger, so you can cut back to a thorough watering (during the cool of the morning or evening) every other day.

4.)    Week three. Your trees should be well on their way to establishing a nice strong set of roots, continue to water every third day for maximum success.

5.)    Week number four. Your shrubs should nearly be established, but they aren’t quite out of the woods yet. Continue to water them once a week.

6.)    Subsequent weeks. Depending on the heat and rain frequency, make sure to implement and maintain a regular watering schedule.  Setting up a slow trickle on your hose and leaving it go for about 45 minutes twice a week, either in the morning or evening, is well worth it. Your trees and shrubs will thank you with their beauty!

Perennials and annuals

 In the heat of the summer we recommend a good watering a couple of times a week for established plants: always in the cool of the day with a focus on the surrounding soil to avoid foliage sunburn from water pooling on leaves. For newly planted or transplanted perennials, more frequent watering might be necessary during warm days or dry periods.Each plant is going to differ in its need for water, so a testing of the soil is a good idea. You don’t want muddy soil, but if it’s dry and chalky that’s obviously not a good sign. A good plan for ensuring maximum beauty is to establish a routine of deadheading and cutting back tired growth.

Also, don’t be alarmed if you’re not seeing too much new growth or flowers the first year. Peonies, for example, routinely take a growing season to establish themselves before they’ll reward you with new blooms. 

If your yard features window boxes or containers even extra care should be taken to keep them looking their best. Plants in containers use potting mix instead of soil and need more water than plants in the ground. Ideally, a daily drink right at the soil around plants first thing in the morning is best (this helps with water retention, decreases chances of burnt foliage, and decreases likelihood of mildew growth). No blasting of the soil though, a gentle flow is your aim. If you can’t do it daily, every second or third day, especially in the heat of the summer, is pretty much mandatory. Remember, we’re not talking a deluge here, more like a gentle soak until the peat based potting mix is well moistened, but not soaking.

Remember, regardless of how established your garden is, it is best not to leave the hydration of your plants up to Mother Nature. We love July’s sun-filled days in the garden knowing that we will need to help out with watering to optimize our garden’s beauty.

Colleen Alexander

Colleen Alexander offers tailored human resource solutions to organizations who want to build capacity, strengthen internal capabilities and increase employee engagement. Individuals seeking professional career transition services benefit from Colleen's expertise and extensive network in seeking a new job or career. Colleen's management consulting background includes writing winning proposals and grant applications, customer surveys and marketing. Colleen is the Founder and Creative Director of The She Shed (www.thesheshed.ca).

Goutweed - A Gardener's Nemesis

Goutweed - sometimes known as bishop's weed, snow-on-the-mountain, ground elder or goatweed (yes, it is sometimes spelled this way – it got its name from how much goats love eating the stuff!) – has been called “pernicious as hell” and so “successful an adversary as to nearly be respected.”

Originally from Europe and Northern Asia (the fact it thrives in Siberia should tell us something), goutweed hitched a ride with settlers to North America, whereupon it was sometimes intentionally used as groundcover in new settlements, in addition to being used for food. Once established in an area, it invades into its surrounding areas and chokes out existing vegetation. Although no longer sold in most nurseries, it can still occasionally be found for sale as ornamental ground-covering at community bazaars and garage sales. 

Zombies of the plant kingdom, this invasive species will survive, and even multiply, in response to anything but well-strategized full out warfare. In fact, more than one professional gardener has suggested moving, not completely tongue -in-cheek, as a legitimate response to a goutweed infestation. Here at THE SHE SHED though, where we thrive on the principles of perseverance and tenacity, we’ve found a few ways to vanquish the beast, and you can too. 

The trick to understanding goutweed is that it spreads through its long white branching roots, or rhizomes. What this means is that while you don’t have to worry about it proliferating via seeds, simply pulling it is not going to do the trick. And, some well-intentioned methods of control will make it worse. Cultivating, for example, is a terrible idea. Because even the smallest part of the plant’s root system will sprout, simply plucking it or chopping at it does no good, and might even lead to spreading it. 

That said, there are ways to deal with it...over time.  Here’s how.

1  The Dig and Sift

For this method, understanding that the root systems can go down as deep as *gasp* a foot, the savvy gardener excavates a foot of soil off the visibly affected area. Also, be sure to extend your digging area by about a foot around the visible perimeter of the weed (just because the plants aren’t above ground, doesn’t mean they’re not quietly spreading below). Depending on the size of the afflicted area, once dug up, you can either dispose of the soil (always take it to the landfill), or meticulously sift through it for left over rhizomes.

2  Solarizing

Though some suggest simply mowing the afflicted area and then covering the area with a black tarp (make sure there are no areas where sun can get through) starting in the early spring and lasting through to fall, we advocate eradicating all visible signs of the weed first through pulling and sifting through the top soil, then pinning down the black tarp over the area (and an extra foot on all sides). If you can persevere through the poor aesthetics for the season, this method will starve the plant of carbohydrates made through photosynthesis.  If you have established plants in the area, you will need to remove them. As they will be contaminated with the weed, you can either dispose of them, or manually remove the rhizomes and quarantine them in pots for the season to ensure their soil is weed-free. 

3  Frequent mowing

Depending on the area affected, weed whacking or mowing can be an effective control of goutweed’s spread as it decreases the plant’s ability to photosynthesize. If thoroughly and persistently carried out weekly, this method will eventually weaken and kill the weed, but it will take much persistence and perhaps years to achieve the desired result.

4  Heavy Mulching

We’re not huge fans of this method as a stand-along solution but some have found success with it. Proponents of this approach advise mowing the weeds close to the ground and then putting down approximately a foot of mulch on top of the affected area (and, of course, a foot around all visible signs of growth). The reasoning is that the plant’s leaves and root system will migrate towards the light and be much simpler to extract from the loose mulch. With continuous extraction, the weed should be able to be eliminated over several seasons.

5  Trenching

Finally, because goutweed is notorious for creeping through boundary lines, chances are that if you have goutweed, your neighbour does too. The best way to keep goutweed out of your yard is to trench. We’ve had success creating a 12 inch wide by 12 inch deep ditch along the property’s perimeter. First we dig, then we line with geotextile landscaping fabric, and finally we fill with gravel. Once this is done, the travelling rhizomes from the neighbor’s yard can’t penetrate through the trench. Usually, we develop a landscape design that includes mulching over the trenched area as a part of the landscape.

  Aegopodium podagraria.   The solid green variety of goutweed is the most invasive.

Aegopodium podagraria.  The solid green variety of goutweed is the most invasive.

Goatweed is on the list of invasive species for the Halifax Regional Municipality and it is the most common issue that we are contacted about by local homeowners.

Be sure to monitor your property for this tenacious weed looking for it in either of it's two colours - solid green or a varigated yellow and green leaf.  

Composting

It may seem to go without saying, but as goutweed grows under even the most severe of conditions, do not dispose of it in your compost: it will contaminate your bin. It has been known to bloom five days after being pulled, so please dispose of it accordingly!

Sharing Plants

While it can be neighborly to share or accept divided perennials, it is also one of the most common ways that your property can be impacted by goutweed. Even if there is no sign of a goutweed leaf, its rhizomes or dormant seeds may be present in the soil...so beware!

 variegated leaf goutweed can still be found for sale as an ornamental ground cover at flea markets.  

variegated leaf goutweed can still be found for sale as an ornamental ground cover at flea markets.  

Edibles

If revenge is best served cold, why not try adding goutweed to your salads? It is used as a popular vegetable, and even prized for its medicinal properties by many cultures throughout the world. 

For more fun facts, check out http://www.thisgardenisillegal.com/2006/05/virtues-of-bishops-weeds.html

And that’s it folks. We’d love to hear your experience with this tricky creeper, please feel free to reach out!

2 Comments

Colleen Alexander

Colleen Alexander offers tailored human resource solutions to organizations who want to build capacity, strengthen internal capabilities and increase employee engagement. Individuals seeking professional career transition services benefit from Colleen's expertise and extensive network in seeking a new job or career. Colleen's management consulting background includes writing winning proposals and grant applications, customer surveys and marketing. Colleen is the Founder and Creative Director of The She Shed (www.thesheshed.ca).

The Inspired Potager Garden

I took a vacation in southern France a few years ago. I stayed in an old country-estate-turned-inn that packaged a cozy room, meals and touring bicycle with GPS to guide guests through the spectacular Provence countryside. The innkeeper Nick, was both cycling fanatic and chef.  On arrival, he showed me to my room with its view of Mont Ventoux (stage 15 of the 2013 Tour de France) while promising me a culinary experience each evening at the end of each day of cycling.

My first ride was to Menerbes, a mountain top, walled village made famous by British author Peter Mayle in his book A Year in Provence. I returned to the inn with rubbery legs and my appetite piqued for the evening meal. I sat on the inn’s terrasse, indulged in the lavender and herb scented air and sipped wine from nearby Avignon.

That evening meal represented the bounty of the region. And at every meal thereafter, I leaned close to my plate and breathed in bold, fresh fragrance before taking my first bite. I learned that Nick’s secret to preparing meals with sensory seduction was his potager garden near the kitchen door.

 Lavender and thyme are perennial favorites....puppy caper watches a bee at work.  Lavender blooms early and I harvest it twice each year.

Lavender and thyme are perennial favorites....puppy caper watches a bee at work.  Lavender blooms early and I harvest it twice each year.

A potager garden is one that uses both edible and ornamental plants to create vegetable gardens that are utilitarian and designed with beauty in mind. Pronounced puh ta zhay, the fashionable French love formal and symmetrically designed potager gardens, but they can be as complicated or easy going as you want…and in my case, it’s the latter. 

The memory of those meals and garden has inspired me to create a perennial herb potager. I will plant the herbs found in Herbes de Provence…thyme, savory, oregano, rosemary, marjoram and lavender. While some recipes for this herbal blend refer to lavender as optional, for me it is essential.  I love its taste and fragrance in quinoa salad, fennel butter rubbed roasted leg of lamb and even buttery shortbread cookies. Perennial herb transplants are available in a surprisingly large variety and will come back every year making transplants a smart, one time investment.

 scarlet runner beans climb high on tuteurs.

scarlet runner beans climb high on tuteurs.

Last summer I excavated a 5x7 garden bed in a sunny area of my small urban backyard. I dug out an unexpected (and exhausting) number of large rocks before filling the bed with rich triple mix garden soil. I grew tennis ball courgette, bite-sized peppers, scarlet runner beans and pretty (and edible) nasturtiums that I enjoyed looking at from my kitchen window. Surrounded by dry stacked stone walls, this bed is perfect for perennial herbs like mint can run amok.

Generally, perennial herbs are fairly easy to grow.  They need rich, well-drained soil, regular watering, minimal pruning to keep them looking their best and a bit of fertilizing during the growing season. Some, like lavender, can tolerate full sun and drought while others prefer a bit of shade...but for the most part most people with a spot of soil can grow herbs.

 Bright lights swiss chard has red, orange and yellow stems...delicious, Nutritious, easy to grow and beautiful.

Bright lights swiss chard has red, orange and yellow stems...delicious, Nutritious, easy to grow and beautiful.

To help shop for my garden, I created a list of my favorite perennial herbs and went shopping.  I like Sweet Valley Herbs from New Brunswick which offer an amazing selection through Nova Scotia garden centers.  I’ve found variegated lemon thyme that will be used in place of the silver or green varieties and a tri-colour sage that is green, gold and purple.  Perennial winter savory will likely be planted beside an annual summer variety which is sweeter in flavor while barbeque rosemary  can be cut and soaked in water before using as flavorful skewer for meat or veggies on the grill.  Moroccan mint will be grown for use in my favorite Thai spring roll recipe.  I’ll pick up perennial sweet marjoram as well as annual, green Dolce Fresca basil for pesto and a purple variety too for tomato salad.

I have a lavender plant to move into the potager. It's fragrant upright purple blooms and silver fine leaves will contrast with nasturtiums that will tumble over and soften the rock walls while adding brilliant shades of orange, yellow and red. Colourful mesclun greens and flowering chives will be planted at the perimeter for easy reach while scarlet runner beans will climb tuteurs bringing food for pollinators, create shade for tender herbs like basil and increase production from a small space.

 orange nasturtium, yellow tennis ball courgette and shiny green peppers provide beautiful color in the potager.

orange nasturtium, yellow tennis ball courgette and shiny green peppers provide beautiful color in the potager.

I'll eat herbs fresh all summer and in the fall I'll let the sun dry off the morning dew before cutting and tieing leaves and stems into small bundles.  They'll be hung (flowers facing down) in a dry, warm spot inside paper bags that have been punctured with a few holes. After harvesting, the plants will be cut back based on their unique needs. Woody lavender branches, for example, need to keep green leaves intact so they can rejuvenate themselves the following spring.

With a bit of planning and research, a potager garden can be created without a lot of skill or land.  Growing herbs will be my pleasure...and each meal will remind me of the scent and taste of Provence without leaving home.

Colleen Alexander

Colleen Alexander offers tailored human resource solutions to organizations who want to build capacity, strengthen internal capabilities and increase employee engagement. Individuals seeking professional career transition services benefit from Colleen's expertise and extensive network in seeking a new job or career. Colleen's management consulting background includes writing winning proposals and grant applications, customer surveys and marketing. Colleen is the Founder and Creative Director of The She Shed (www.thesheshed.ca).

Raised Bed Gardening

 My Bedford, Nova Scotia urban garden mixes it up: tomatoes from raised beds, cucumbers from containers and beans grown on a bamboo trellis in an in-ground garden bed. 

My Bedford, Nova Scotia urban garden mixes it up: tomatoes from raised beds, cucumbers from containers and beans grown on a bamboo trellis in an in-ground garden bed. 

Raised garden beds are cropping up in backyards all over HRM...and front yards too! They are an excellent option for urbanites who want to grow fresh, delicious food while enjoying the fresh air, sun and pleasure that comes from gardening.  

Here are some ideas to maximize the benefits of raised beds in your urban environment.

  1. Save your back: Build beds that are 12" tall (or more) to help you enjoy the physical benefits of planting, tending and harvesting food. Beds that are 4 feet wide allow access within an arm's reach from both sides and make picking salad greens a breeze.
  2. Grow longer: the soil in raised beds often warms up earlier in spring than the surrounding ground allowing you to get cool-season crops planted sooner, extending the growing season and increasing your vegetable crop choices. Raised beds also allow for easy installation of row covers and frost blankets for early planting and late harvests.
  3. Overcome poor soil: Rather than trying to improve sandy or clay soil, raised beds can be easily filled with nutritious garden soil. Use a mix of clean top- soil, compost, peat, well-rotted manure or other moisture retaining, high nutrient materials like seaweed. Make your own compost from lawn clippings, plant-based kitchen scraps, leaves and organic garden materials.
  4. No-till: The days of tilling are behind us for farming and till-free practices extend into urban growing too. Tilling disturbs nutrient-producing soil microorganisms that feed plants. Don't till....instead, top dress your soil each year with good quality, well-rotted compost and leave the rest to mother nature. Allow compost to naturally decompose so that it improves soil texture that helps plant roots develop and absorb nutrients easily.
  5. Reduce weeds and spreading grass: When installing raised beds, line the bottom with clean, wax-free cardboard to prevent weed seed germination before filling them with rich soil. Adding an inch or two of natural mulch will prevent surface weeds, preserve soil moisture and add valuable nutrients as it breaks down over time. Raised beds prevent grass from getting into your vegetable garden the way it tends to with in-ground gardens.
  6. Clean and neat: Raised beds are easy to mow around while maintaining a neat and tidy appearance. Spread mulch or pea gravel in paths between raised beds to keep feet clean in wet weather.  Paths also help direct foot traffic, keeping your soil from being walked on and compacted. Finally, raised beds keep out ground rodents and are easier to cover to stave off larger animals.

Whether you want food, flowers or both....raised beds offer a convenient way to garden that is easy on the body while promoting an active, healthy lifestyle.  Get growing!

 Pretty, edible nasturtiums grow among tennis ball squash and bite sized peppers in a raised bed.

Pretty, edible nasturtiums grow among tennis ball squash and bite sized peppers in a raised bed.

Colleen Alexander

Colleen Alexander offers tailored human resource solutions to organizations who want to build capacity, strengthen internal capabilities and increase employee engagement. Individuals seeking professional career transition services benefit from Colleen's expertise and extensive network in seeking a new job or career. Colleen's management consulting background includes writing winning proposals and grant applications, customer surveys and marketing. Colleen is the Founder and Creative Director of The She Shed (www.thesheshed.ca).

Unleash your Inner Urban Farmer!

 courgette, sungold and stupice tomatoes and sweet peas in the pod from your garden will taste as good as they look!

courgette, sungold and stupice tomatoes and sweet peas in the pod from your garden will taste as good as they look!

You don't need a farm or a large yard to enjoy growing your own fruits and vegetables. Growing food is relaxing and food you grow yourself always tastes better than commercial grocery produce.

Before deciding what you want to grow, find the perfect location and consider how much time and effort you want to put into your garden.

Here are three steps to guide you as you plant your urban vegetable garden.

1.  Get Started

 these Fingerling potatoes plants were grown in recycled seed bags in a part-sun/shade area of the yard; they were moved around as needed to maximize sunlight exposure.

these Fingerling potatoes plants were grown in recycled seed bags in a part-sun/shade area of the yard; they were moved around as needed to maximize sunlight exposure.

Pick a location:  Look for a sunny spot that gets at least 6 hours of sun each day. If you are planting in the ground, monitor potential sites this spring to be sure of good drainage (there should be no puddles after rain).

Know your soil:  every garden needs soil that is nutrient rich and has plenty of organic matter. You can add compost easily but if you aren't sure if your soil has ample nutrients, send a sample away for analysis.(https://novascotia.ca/agri/documents/lab-services/analytical-lab-soil-analysis.pdf).

Dig in: pick from container gardening on the balcony, raised and in-ground gardens or join a local community garden. Here's the pros and cons of each option to help you decide what's right for you.

 A baby cucumber ready to eat and tiny ones on their way!  These Wisconsin cucumbers were grown from seed and planted in 3 gallon nursery containers on a stone patio beside The She Shed.

A baby cucumber ready to eat and tiny ones on their way!  These Wisconsin cucumbers were grown from seed and planted in 3 gallon nursery containers on a stone patio beside The She Shed.

Containers

  • Pros:  perfect for small spaces, even an urban balcony - make sure your containers are deep enough for roots to grow (at least 12-18" in diameter for leafy veg and 3 gallon containers for cucumbers or tomatoes; lots of sun and drainage is key - never use regular soil because it will compact and water won't drain properly)
  • Cons: need frequent (often daily) watering when it's hot and sunny - try herbs, greens or grow dwarf varieties developed and sold by many seed companies for use on balconies or small areas

Community Gardens

  • Pros:  community gardens offer opportunities to interact with your neighbours, encourage environmental sustainability and promote active living while making your neighbourhood more beautiful; plant veggies, fruit, herbs, flowers or ornamental plants in a common area with shared upkeep and individual garden plots
  • Cons:  very popular so there may be a waiting list
 Installing raised beds with our favorite young gardeners at Via Vita Academy.

Installing raised beds with our favorite young gardeners at Via Vita Academy.

Raised Gardens

  • Pros:  easy to customize soil, plant more intensively and customize soil; soil in raised beds heat up faster in the spring so you can plant earlier; flexible heights make it easier on your back and knees; look for long-lasting hemlock as a long lasting and affordable alternative to cedar
  • Cons:  while they don't drain as quickly as containers, you may need to water and fertilize more often than with in ground gardens; initial costs may be higher than growing in the ground
 Scarlet runner beans growing on bamboo supports provide beauty and food for pollinators in the garden.  the bamboo is taken down and stored in the she shed over the winter.  next year they will be used again to build a space-saving vertical growing structure for beans, peas...or both!

Scarlet runner beans growing on bamboo supports provide beauty and food for pollinators in the garden.  the bamboo is taken down and stored in the she shed over the winter.  next year they will be used again to build a space-saving vertical growing structure for beans, peas...or both!

 

In Ground Gardens

  • Pros:  this method is usually the most economical although your existing soil may need testing and/or amendments; you will need to water less often than with containers or raised beds
  • Cons:  you must work with what Mother Nature has given you including rocky soil, tree roots or poor soil

2.  Pick What (and When) to Plant

Learn what grows well in your area by visiting nurseries or talking with other gardeners.  Then, pick what you like to eat and determine when to plant it.

Seeds vs Transplanted Seedlings

Seeds are an inexpensive way to grow food and offer a way to grow a much wider (and exotic) range of varieties. However, they require more effort because some need to be started indoors and you will need to wait longer to harvest food grown from seed sown directly in the ground

 swiss chard is a member of the beet family but puts its energy into producing tasty leaves and crunch stalks.  rainbow chard has brightly colored stalks and veins for a beautiful summer salad bowl. 

swiss chard is a member of the beet family but puts its energy into producing tasty leaves and crunch stalks.  rainbow chard has brightly colored stalks and veins for a beautiful summer salad bowl. 

Transplanted seedlings are handy to get new or busy gardeners started.  They do cost more than growing from seed and you will have a more limited number of varieties of plants to pick from.  Overall, transplanted seedlings from a nursery is a great option to consider if you are short on space, time or experience.

When to Plant

Warm spring weather makes it tempting to get seeds and transplants in the ground.  Be sure to know when the last frost date is for your area by looking on line or asking at your local nursery.  Even then, a last minute cold snap can hurt or kill tender plants.  Peas, broccoli and other varieties however, can tolerate cold so do your homework. Check seed packages or ask at your garden center

So Happy Together!

Plant edibles that require similar amounts of water and sunlight in the same bed or container.  Known as companion planting, this can help maximize space and time.  For example, grow tomatoes, peppers and eggplant together;  they all like warm weather and must be planted out after the frost warning have waned.  Edge beds with basil and parsley that enjoy the same growing conditions.  Or, plants kale and chard together; both are quick and easy to grow although kale prefers cool weather while chard is less particular.

3.  Tend and Harvest!

 nasturtium is planted near Courgette and peppers can repel squash bugs, act as a trap crop for aphids or be a lovely and edible salad garnish.

nasturtium is planted near Courgette and peppers can repel squash bugs, act as a trap crop for aphids or be a lovely and edible salad garnish.

Preparing and planting your garden takes a little bit of planning and time but is well worth the effort.  Once done, all you need to do is basic maintenance.

Feed:  Add compost at the beginning of the season and then we find it easy to use either an organic water soluble fish fertilizer as the season progresses

Hydrate: start with moist soil before you plant seeds or transplants.  Then, water deeply as needed making sure to water the roots and soil around plants and not the leaves or edible material.  Add mulch around seedlings to help retain moisture and reduce soil from splashing on leaves.

Weed:  monitor your garden and remove weed sprouts as you see them rather than letting them grow and rob your soil of nutrients.  Avoid weed control products in edible gardens.

Resow:  fast growing radish and lettuce seeds can be resown every few weeks to ensure a continuous supply of salad.

We think there is nothing more magical or delicious than eating fresh food from your garden....little tomatoes that you pluck off the vine and pop in your mouth are amazing!  

So roll up your sleeves and get growing!

Colleen Alexander

Colleen Alexander offers tailored human resource solutions to organizations who want to build capacity, strengthen internal capabilities and increase employee engagement. Individuals seeking professional career transition services benefit from Colleen's expertise and extensive network in seeking a new job or career. Colleen's management consulting background includes writing winning proposals and grant applications, customer surveys and marketing. Colleen is the Founder and Creative Director of The She Shed (www.thesheshed.ca).